Dr. Seuss and His Impact on Education and Literature, Pt. 2

Dr. Seuss and His Impact

                                              on Education

                                                      and Literature, Pt. 2 –

                                         The Timelessness of Dr. Seuss and his Work
History has seen countless talented writers, many of which making history on their merit alone. When writing children’s books, it takes a certain kind of talent to become one of the greats, as children are not impressed by fancy words or underlying themes. Children want to hear fun, captivating stories set in a bright and colorful world, and Dr. Seuss achieved just that with his whimsical One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fishtales. Since his rise to fame, hundreds of children’s authors have drawn inspiration from Dr. Seuss, but none have ever achieved his level of recognition. In part 2 of this series, we will be taking a look at what made Dr. Seuss and his stories so unique, and how this uniqueness has played its part in making the children’s writer a part of history.
Think back to your favorite Dr. Seuss book – whether it be One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish, Horton Hears a Who!, or The Lorax, you probably have a favorite that sticks with you to this today. What about that story caught your attention? In the case of books like The Lorax, it may have been the story itself, rather than the telling. For other tales, it may have been the ,or fun rhyming patterns that caught your attention as a child. Anyone would be hard pressed to think of another author or series that utilizes the same fun mechanics found in Dr. Seuss tales, and this is part of what has made his work such an essential part of childhood.

 

Dr Seuss

Oh, the Places You’ll Go

As children, we lost ourselves in the worlds of Dr. Seuss. My personal favorite to this day is Oh, the Places You’ll Go, a tale that played an important part in finding myself as a youth. To this day I look back on this story with fond memories, understanding fully the role it played in helping me become who I am today. But what was it about Oh, the Places You’ll Go that had such an impact where all other books of my childhood fell short? I was an avid reader during my youth, choosing books over television every chance I had; between the ages of five (when I first learned to read fluently) and eighteen, I read hundreds of books, yet very few have stuck with me quite like Oh, the Places You’ll Go.
Many readers experience this same phenomenon when reading stories by Dr. Seuss. As adults, there are very few authors we reflect on with such positive memories, yet none of us will ever forget our favorite Dr. Seuss tales.
This is the beauty behind Dr. Seuss and his wonderful books, as the unique timelessness of his Oh The Places You'll Gostorytelling is nothing less than unforgettable. Anyone can be a great writer, but few can re-create the sheer agelessness of these bright and imaginative children’s books. This is what makes Dr. Seuss such a legend: he not only told stories, but made them relevant to children of all generations. Our parents and grandparents enjoyed Dr. Seuss much as we did, and our children will do the same. Despite the advances of technology and society, people across all generations can connect through a mutual love of Dr. Seuss’s timeless tales, and this is what makes him so unique compared to other writers of the 20th century.

Dr. Seuss and His Impact on Education and Literature, Pt. 3

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